What is a pre-screen?
How much will it cost me?
Why do I have to give my income?
Will my health insurance pay for my treatment?
Do I have to use my health insurance?
If I choose to use my health insurance, will my employer find out I am seeking treatment?
Can I make payments?
What if my income information changes?
How do I know if I have a substance abuse problem?
Can I admit a family member or friend into treatment for their substance abuse?
How can I help a family member or friend realize they have a substance abuse problem?
I do not live in Indiana or Armstrong Counties and I need help for my substance abuse problem.
What is a screening?
What is an intake (or drug and alcohol assessment)?
What is outpatient treatment?
What is inpatient treatment?
What is a CRN?
What is Alcohol Highway Safe Driving School?
Goals of an intervention.
When is it okay to do an intervention?
When is it improper to do an intervention?
What is Crisis?

What areas does crisis cover?
What services are offered for those in crisis?


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What is a pre-screen?

A pre screen is the initial screening process prior to you coming in for an evaluation. Our pre-screen staff will ask you a series of questions and determine your financial liability, if any. They will then give you an appointment or a referral to another facility.


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How much will it cost me?

That depends on many factors: why you are coming here, what type of services you will be receiving, if you have insurance, if you a resident of Armstrong/Indiana county, etc. When you call to set up an appointment, our screeners will ask you a series of questions and will determine your financial liability, if any.


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Why do I have to give my income?

The Open Door receives funding from the state, and as a requirement for you to receive this funding, if eligible, is that you are required to give your income and supply proof of that income. If you choose not to give this information, you will be required to pay full fee for all of your services.


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Will my health insurance pay for my treatment?

Many health insurance plans have benefits for outpatient substance abuse. Prior to your evaluation, a member of our staff will check on the benefit information and will obtain authorization, if required, for the evaluation. If your health insurance does not have benefits for outpatient substance abuse, our staff will notify you prior to your evaluation.


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Do I have to use my health insurance?

This depends on the reason you are choosing not to use your insurance. You can discuss your options during the time of your pre-screen.


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If I choose to use my health insurance, will my employer find out I am seeking treatment?

Privacy laws forbid employers from finding out what type of claims are being filed for their employees.


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Can I make payments?

It all depends on what type of service you are coming to The Open Door for. Please inquire with a staff member of The Open Door.

 


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What if my income information changes?

You need to notify a staff member immediately. They will update your liability form which will be effective the day that you notify us of the change.


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How do I know if I have a substance abuse problem?

Take a quick quiz at the following website: Take Quiz.
For more information about alcohol, drugs and addiction click on : Alcohol, Drugs, Addiction

Talk to the Crisis Hotline at The Open Door: 1-877-333-2470.


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Can I admit a family member or friend into treatment for their substance abuse?

•  NO. Only the person with the substance abuse problem can schedule or reschedule their appointments.


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How can I help a family member or friend realize they have a substance abuse problem?

The Open Door Crisis Hotline can provide information about how to conduct an intervention. An intervention is a caring, deliberate, and well-conceived event, through which people who care express their concern. It is a safe and intentional opportunity for them to reflect back to their loved one the ramifications of his or her behavior on themselves and others, and to present a plan to change and get help in ways that will address the causes and alleviate the suffering of all involved. **The Open Door cannot instruct, or participate in a family intervention; we can only provide education to family members and friends on how to conduct the intervention.


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I do not live in Indiana or Armstrong Counties and I need help for my substance abuse problem.

You can find help for substance related services in PA by calling the PA Get Help Now number at 1-800-662-4357 (HELP). For out of state resources, an online search will yield results of Alcohol and Other Drug providers in your area


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What is a screening?

Screening is a process by which the client is determined appropriate and eligible for admission to a particular level of care. They take about 10-15 minutes, and can be done 24/7 by calling The Open Door or walking in during business hours. Criteria considered are psychological, social and physiological signs and symptoms of alcohol and other drug use and abuse. Coexisting conditions (medical, psychiatric, physical, etc) that indicate the need for additional professional assessment and/or services are identified. A screening is completed to schedule an intake.


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What is an intake (or drug and alcohol assessment)?

An Assessment is the procedure by which a counselor/program identifies and evaluates an individual's strengths, weaknesses, problems and needs for the development of a treatment plan. They last about an hour-and-a-half, and a pre-screen must be completed before an assessment can be scheduled (see above). At this time relevant history is gathered from the client including but not limited to alcohol and other drug use during an interview process. The counselor identifies methods and procedures for obtaining corroborative information from significant secondary sources regarding client's alcohol and other drug abuse and psycho-social history. From this information the counselor develops a diagnostic evaluation of the client's substance abuse and any coexisting conditions based on the results of all assessments in order to provide an integrated approach to treatment planning based on the client's strengths, weaknesses, and identified problems and needs.

An Intake is the administrative and initial assessment procedures for admission to a particular level of care. Required documents for admission to a program are completed such as forms documenting eligibility and appropriateness. Appropriately signed consents are obtained when soliciting from or providing information to outside sources to protect client confidentiality and rights.


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What is outpatient treatment?

The Open Door provides various levels of care which is determined by State approved criteria. A description of each service level is as follows:

OUTPATIENT TREATMENT:

Outpatient treatment is an organized, non-residential treatment service providing psychotherapy in which the client resides outside the facility. These services are usually provided in regularly scheduled treatment sessions for, at most , five hours per week.

INTENSIVE OUTPATIENT TREATMENT:

Intensive Outpatient Treatment is an organized, non-residential treatment service in which the client resides outside the facility. It provides structured, psychotherapy and client stability through increased periods of staff intervention. These services are provided according to a planned regimen consisting of regularly scheduled treatment sessions at least three days per week for, at least, five hours (but less than ten).

PARTIAL HOSPITALIZATION:

PHP substance abuse treatment services is a non-acute, time-limited, structured level of care option that offers comprehensive, therapeutically intense care meant to serve as a transitional level of care for those clients stepping down from inpatient or residential programs or as an alternative treatment option to prevent relapse or hospitalization while encouraging independence and self-efficacy by providing services in an outpatient setting. The program will consist of treatment oriented group, and individual activities including 1-2 hours of individual therapy per week, and 16-17 hrs of group therapy per week (3-4 hours a day, 5 days a week), Supplemented by referral to self-help or educational groups, or other recovery supporting activities, as defined in the individual client treatment plan. Group activities include (but not be limited to): early recovery issues, building and utilizing coping mechanisms, developing sober supports, building a recovery lifestyle, and relapse prevention. Average length of stay is 3 months (range: 1-6 months).


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What is inpatient treatment?

Inpatient treatment is a broad term for a type of service that has various levels of care. The Open Door is NOT an inpatient facility . The Open Door provides intensive case management services for residents of Indiana or Armstrong County interested in receiving inpatient services, setting up appointments and possible transportation from The Open Door to an inpatient facility. A description of each level of inpatient care is as follows:

MEDICALLY MONITORED INPATIENT DETOX:

Medically Monitored Inpatient Detoxification is a treatment conducted in a residential facility that provides a 24-hour professionally directed evaluation and detoxification of addicted clients. Detoxification is the process whereby a drug – or alcohol- intoxicated or dependent client is assisted through the period of time equired to eliminate the presence of the intoxicating substance (by metabolic or other means) and any other dependency factors while keeping the physiological and psychological risk to the client at a minimum. This process should also include efforts to motivate and support the client to seek formal treatment after the detoxification process. This type of care utilizes multi-disciplinary personnel for clients whose withdrawal problems (with or without biomedical and/or emotional problems) are severe enough to require inpatient services, 24-hour observation, monitoring, and, usually, medication. However, the full resources of an acute care general hospital or a medically managed intensive inpatient treatment system are not necessary. This treatment is specific to psychoactive substance use. The multi-disciplinary team and the availability of support services allows detoxification and a level of treatment consistent with the client's mental state and required length of stay, as well as the conjoin treatment of any coexisting sub-acute biomedical or emotional conditions which could jeopardize recovery.

MEDICALLY MONITORED SHORT TERM RESIDENTIAL:

Medically Monitored Short Term Residential treatment is a type of service that includes 24-hour professionally directed evaluation, care, and treatment for addicted clients in acute distress. These clients' addiction symptomatology is demonstrated by moderate impairment of social, occupational, or school functioning. Rehabilitation is a key treatment goal.

MEDICALLY MANAGED INPATIENT DETOX:

Medically Managed Inpatient Detoxification is a type of treatment which provides 24-hour medically directed evaluation and detoxification of psychoactive substance use disordered clients in an acute care setting. Detoxification is the process whereby a drug –or alcohol- intoxicated or dependent client is assisted through the period of time required to eliminate the presence of the intoxicating substance (by metabolic or other means) and any other dependency factors while keeping the physiological and psychological risk to the client at a minimum. Ideally, this process should also include efforts to motivate and support the client to seek formal treatment after the detoxification process. The clients who utilize this type of care have acute withdrawal problems (with or without biomedical and/or emotional/behavioral problems) which are severe enough to require primary medical and nursing care facilities. 24-hour medical service is provided, and the full resources of the hospital facility are available. Although this treatment is specific to psychoactive substance use disorder, the multi-disciplinary team and the availability of support services allows for the conjoint treatment of coexisting acute biomedical and/or emotional/behavioral conditions which could jeopardize recovery and need to be addressed.

MEDICALLY MANAGED INPATIENT RESIDENTIAL:

Medically Managed Inpatient Residential treatment provides 24-hour medically directed evaluation, care and treatment for addicted clients with coexisting biomedical, psychiatric, and/or behavioral conditions which require frequent care. Facilities for such services need to have, at minimum, 24-hour nursing care, 24- hour access to specialized medical care and intensive medical care, and 24-hour access to physician care.


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What is a CRN?

A CRN is a C ourt R eporting N etwork evaluation. This appointment is a condition of bond and mandate of Pennsylvania . This appointment is initially scheduled by District Justices . The cost of the CRN is $75 in CASH with a $10 rescheduling fee which increases with each missed appointment. The CRN appointment will result in a computer generated profile which becomes a part of the court order.The profile will list specific conditions which the offender must complete.


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What is Alcohol Highway Safety School ?

•  Pennsylvania mandate of 12.5 – 15 hour educational component for Driving Under the Influence

•  Enrollment Form may be completed at the time of the Court Reporting Network appointment. The two options for the classes are:

  • 3 consecutive Monday evenings
  • 1 Weekend class (Friday evening and all-day Saturday)

•  Rescheduling classes may result in extended license suspension

•  Cost - $225 per class option if arrested in Indiana County

•  $250 per class option if out of county arrest (transfers)

•  Rescheduling is an option one time only and the class date will occur within six months.

•  If the offenders are non-compliant they are responsible for a $40.00 rescheduling fee and they must pay for the classes prior to being scheduled.


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Goals of an intervention:

1. Preserve the dignity of the person needing an intervention.

2. Reduce their shame.

3. Avoid arousing defense mechanisms.

4. Show love and concern for the addicted person.

5. Help the person realize they need to seek help and follow through with treatment, counseling or actions to better their situation.


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When is it okay to do an intervention?

1. A person has an addiction or is living in excess: alcohol or other drugs, gambling, eating disorder, homeless, in an abusive situation, or other harmful living condition.

2. The person does not realize their addiction or living situation is harmful to them and to those around them – they suspect if the person continues on their present path their will be harmful consequences to them, such as death or involvement with the criminal justice system.


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When is it improper to do an intervention?

1. When the family/friends conducting the intervention suspects the person will react with violence against them.

2. When the intervention becomes removed from the goals into an angry, blaming environment too convoluted to discuss the problem in a serene helpful way.

For more information about interventions, including steps and support, or to get information on how to schedule an intervention with a specially trained Open Door staff member, please call the 24 hour CRISIS HOTLINE: 1-877-333-2470, or get more information by Clicking Here.

 


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What is Crisis?

A crisis is defined by the consumer. Any situation that the consumer feels they are unable to handle, that may cause stress or difficulty in life, or need to see if there are any resources or services that they may benefit from; they can call the crisis hotline anytime 24/7 and talk with a Crisis Intervention Specialist. We also offer walk-in hours at our Indiana location, and 24/7 mobile crisis (accessed through the hotline).


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What areas does crisis cover?

Armstrong-Indiana Crisis covers all of Armstrong and Indiana Counties in Western PA. Regardless of the consumer's home address, if they are physically in Armstrong or Indiana county we are able to assist them. However, every county in PA has a dedicated crisis line. For information on a crisis line in another county, please call 1-877-333-2470 and that information will be provided.

 


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What services are offered for those in crisis?

The Crisis Dept. offers a 24/7 Crisis Hotline, Walk-in hours (no appointment necessary), and 24/7 mobile crisis services.

Crisis can offer non-judgemental, confidential support for any difficult situation in a person's life. Unconditional positive regard and compassion for hardships, as well as the ability to talk-through ones' problems, safety plan, and develop social supports; as well as provide resources and referrals for area agencies that may be of further/specialized assistance. If the crisis situation is unable to be resolved through these means, we also have the ability to assist a consumer in getting hospitalization, either through a voluntary (section 201) commitment, or an involunvtary (section 302) commitment.